After causing widespread damage in India during the second wave of the pandemic, the Delta variant has further mutated to form what we know as Delta Plus, a more transmissible and infectious variant of Covid-19 classified as a variant of concern. Identified on June 11, 2021, it is known to spread fast and has been subject to much concern all over the world.

According to Dr NK Arora, Chairman of Covid-19 working group under National Technical Advisory Group on Immunization (NTAGI): “Delta plus is having greater affinity to mucosal lining in the lungs, higher compared to other variants, but if it causes damage or not is not clear yet. It also does not mean that this variant will cause more severe disease or it is more transmissible.” What researchers say is that the transmissibility is unquestionably greater than the wild-type SARS-CoV-2 and the Alpha variant, but that it is generally mild in all those who have gotten either a single or double dose of the vaccine.Β They are still keeping an eye on it and analizing the situation, and the strain will become clear only as more cases are identified.

“(…) another thing that is important is vaccination – the rapidity with which we vaccinate…even single dose is effective and the way we are planning, if we rapidly immunise then possibility of third wave becomes very less because vaccine plus infection plus Covid appropriate behaviour will save us from next wave, mitigate the next wave and the third wave will not be able to cause the damage as was caused in the first two waves“, the Chairman added.

So yes, Delta Plus variant can have an impact on your lungs, but it does not mean that it will happen to each person catching it, nor that this impact will be massive and cause major diseases. Just like for the rest of the variants, it is necessary to still apply social distancing and be careful.